How Much Is Three Years in Federal Prison Worth?

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While there are those who would disagree with me – I feel that there is no amount worth the pain of prison. Having been there myself, I speak from experience.

But the Department of Justice released today that the former president and owner of ATE Tel Solutions, Rafael G. Adame, will spend three years in prison following his conviction for his involvement in a scheme to defraud the federal E-Rate program. The E-Rate program subsidizes the provision of Internet access and telecommunications services, as well as internal computer and communications networks, to economically disadvantaged schools and libraries.

The news release is attached: http://www.usdoj.gov/opa/pr/2007/November/07_at_936.html

According to the news release, ” Adame was convicted of submitting fraudulent invoices for payment to the Schools and Libraries Division of USAC from December 2001 to May 2003. As a result of the scheme to defraud the E-Rate program, Adame fraudulently obtained $106,514 in payments from USAC.”

$106,000+ in theft = three years in federal prison? I don’t get it. But then again, I did something equally as dumb and paid the price. Adame will now come to know the lesson: Every Choice Has A Consequence.

As a business ethics speaker and Senior Sales Executive in a public company, I speak to groups nationwide about choices and consequences. In fact, my most recent presentation is entitled – The Truth About Consequences! While every choice has a consequence – the fact is we can determine whether the consequence is either negative or positive.

Your thoughts about this truth?

Business Ethics Speaker – Chuck Gallagher – Signing off…

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2 Responses to How Much Is Three Years in Federal Prison Worth?

  1. Mr. Salinas,

    First my best to you. I understand the struggles that recovering from our past can involve. It is not easy, but can be done. As I often say, every choice has a consequence. We might make mistakes, but we are not mistakes. By the seeds we sow we will reap a harvest and that harvest can be extraordinarily positive. It’s all in the seeds we sow.

    On to your questions. Anything one chooses to do can be profitable if your intention is right. If you motivation is the money, then by my experience, it might be more difficult as your motivation may not be focused in what is in your highest and best good. I find that as a professional speaker my motivation is to help others. As such, while I am paid to speak, I often will speak for free or a reduced charge if I feel it will benefit the group asking. For example, I recently spoke to Baylor University MBA students at no charge. Could they have paid – sure – but for me it was my way of paying it forward.

    Regarding speaking fees – they range from free (you won’t make much money that way) to well over $10,000 per event. My fees fall in the middle range and as the founder of the Choices Foundation – often I will speak for a donation to the foundation.

    Advice for making a living staying on the positive side of the fence…well, that one’s easy. Make the right choices. Do what is legal. Do it better than anyone else. Make a commitment to be your best and better than others. Often people say that immigrants sure seem to do well in business here in America. Why? Answer is easy, they want it bad. As a convicted felon you have to want it bad in order to succeed. That is what separates the good from the best.

    As a closing thought for those who are aspiring speakers…if you want to be good in that arena…consider the following: (1) what ever you do you have to pay your dues. It won’t come easy; (2) make sure your message is clear and you have the skill to deliver it; (3) make the investment of your time, energy and talent into being the best and you chosen career; and (4) know, beyond a shadow of a doubt, that if you’re following the path of your destiny you will succeed – beyond whatever obstacles are in front of you.

    My best to you!

  2. […] Says: January 3, 2008 at 9:33 pm editMr. Salinas,First my best to you. I understand the struggles that recovering from our past can […]

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