Release Us From Our Bond – Wesley Snipes Might Run!

While the jury is still out, American Bankers Insurance Company of Florida said it could no longer guarantee Snipes’ appearance in court if he is convicted. “[D]efendant Snipes’ waiver of defenses indicates more than a lack of resolve. It can easily be inferred that the defendant has no faith in the judicial system and is an unwilling participant,” Surety Agent Aaron Aaba wrote.

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“It is apparent that he may not vigorously pursue an appeal, if he is not interested in presenting a defense at trial. Therefore, any appeal is likely for purpose of delay in order to allow the defendant to flee,” Aaba’s motion continued. “It is also likely that Snipes simply does not consider himself to be subject to the jurisdiction of the court, or any United States governmental body.”

Snipes, Eddie Ray Kahn and Douglas Rosile are each charged with one count of conspiracy to defraud and one count of aiding and abetting the making of a false and fraudulent claim as part of an alleged tax fraud scheme. Snipes also is charged with six counts of willfully failing to file federal income tax returns.

Now, I’m no lawyer, but I do have a unique perspective as I’ve been in federal prison for tax evasion and know quite a few people who were there for the same thing that Snipes has done – no pay or file tax returns because somehow they felt they shouldn’t have to. I still never cease to be amazed at the responses I receive claiming that taxation on earned income is somehow not statutory. Anyway, back to Wesley…

Apparently the company had asked Snipes’ legal team to increase collateral for the bond, and that the actor’s lawyers had refused.

Hum…why would he pay more money if he won’t pay his taxes. Maybe Wesley is above the law – he’s a universal citizen and no governments rules apply to him? Well…maybe? Anyway, Senior U.S. District Judge William Terrell Hodges rejected the motion because it was not signed by a Florida lawyer or by the surety agent with power of attorney who signed the original bond.

Now wouldn’t you think that if you put a motion before a judge you’d dot the “i’s” and cross the “t’s”?

I suspect a verdict today…but as many odd twists as this trial has taken – who knows?

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