Bloggerdise – A New Online Site Connecting Bloggers with Business

February 18, 2013

A New Online Site Invites Bloggers to “Bloggerdise”:

Bloggerdise.com Connects Businesses with Bloggers To Expand Their Brands

New York, New York. 2/18/2013. You may not realize it now but pretty soon, “Bloggerdising” will be a part of the public lexicon. Before you over think it, remember the first time you heard someone say facebooking or texting?” Bloggerdise.com is an exciting new online site that matches businesses with bloggers. Bloggerdising, then, is the act of advertising products and services that bloggers choose to write about.  The site is a proverbial matching site where bloggers can go to find potential topics to write about and they benefit from specials and offers from the businesses they select.

BloggerdiseBloggerdise.com has taken off quickly with over 6,500 member boxes. Members include artists, celebrities, bands, authors and all sorts of business owners. Big brand companies, such as Amazon.com and Etsy, are also promoted on the site through links to member offerinngs. And the connection does not end when a blogger finds a good match. Members enjoy cross promoting in the message posting areas all throughout the site. On any given day a new author may post a sweet deal that is only available for a short time or another business may offer free products to those who “click now.”

The site is the brainchild of a pretty savvy team that includes Jesse Cohen, Omar Padron, Jin Park and Eric Rogow. Jesse Cohen, talked about how he and the other co-founders figured out there was a need and filled it. “In this cash-strapped economy we just wanted to be able to help an artist, charity, or small business be heard through the unique voices of our bloggers,” he said.

Using the site is simple. Log onto the site and register for free. Then create a box by clicking on the “Post an Offer” option. And that is all that is needed to go live on the site. When bloggers are ready to find offers and giveaways for their blogs, all they need to do is click on the business or bloggers tab and search. Everything from Art to Authors to Health and Relationships and more is available to select from. Several charities and animal shelters have flocked there as well to find help expanding their reach. Click on the boxes of interest, get the contact info and reach out to the respective contacts listed.

JesseThe site offers several tools for members to easily engage and interact with each other. Members can also engage social media directly. They can Facebook “like” and use Facebook to comment on the Bloggerdise boxes and posts; or they can reach out via their personal Twitter and YouTube accounts.

In a challenging economic environment, now small businesses and artists have a place to promote themselves for next to nothing. It is a win win for all. For more information or to become a member, visit: www.Bloggerdise.com


Fraud Prevention and Passwords – sometimes the best offense is the easiest defense!

May 31, 2010

As a business ethics and fraud prevention speaker and author, I find that, nearly every week, someone connected with me has their account hacked and the messages that are sent – well let’s put it this way – they aren’t what they would send.  Adult Friend Finder, Viagra, Canadian drug stores – you name it – the hackers seem to be enamored with using someone else’s Facebook account or email to promote their product or service using your good name.

As an Apple computer user the following was shared related to the common hacking problem that many face.  Take a read and let’s understand the benefit of simple information that can protect your account and your Facebook friends!

Reader Deb Ward is the victim of an increasingly common scam. She writes:

I have a MobileMe account that I believe was hacked. First a message was sent to everyone in my .mac email address book that I was in the UK, held up at gun point, stranded, and to please send money. Then, the hacker was able to get into my .mac account and have my emails forwarded to a Yahoo account! How can this happen? How do I protect my email accounts? And how do I protect the rest of the information on my computers?

While this kind of thing isn’t as common as advance fee fraud (typical of the Nigerian royalty wheeze that’s been around for years), it’s a scam that’s become popular in the past few months. It works this way:

The scammers obtain account addresses (not just from the MobileMe service but other providers as well such as Hotmail, Google, and AOL). They then use computer scripts to generate passwords—using words commonly found in the dictionary—and work through these passwords in the hope of finding one that lets them in. When a working password is found, they go about the nefarious business of grabbing your contacts from the host service and sending out the kind of message that your contacts received. Depending on the service, they can also have messages forwarded to a different account.

COMMENT: I can’t begin to tell you how many FB friends have fallen prey to this “London robbing” scam.  Facts are – when you receive a chat comment or email from a friend announcing their robbery – the initial damage is done.  Now if this come via Facebook chat – my recommendation is (1) keep the chat going.  Express your concern and keep a dialogue while (2) opening another browser and going to Facebook to report the activity.  I have found in doing that – that the folks at Facebook are quick to disable the account thereby eliminating the perpetrator from continuing to scam friends who might be shocked into monetary submission.

Your best hope is that those you associate with are smart enough to ignore this obvious bit of phoniness or, at the very least, check with you to be sure that the message is legitimate. On the other hand, those who do pungle up the dough can be counted as extra special (though pretty gullible) friends. Please treat them gently.

As for protection, Protection Tip Number One is to use a password that can’t be easily guessed. If it’s in the dictionary, it’s a bad password. If it’s in the dictionary and you’ve appended a couple of significant numbers after it—your birthday or age—it’s still a bad password. If it’s a pattern of characters on your keyboard—adgjl’, for example, it’s a bad password. If it’s eight characters or less, it’s possibly an okay password, but not a great one.

Protection Tip Number Two is to not use the same password for everything you do. If you unlock your e-mail, Apple ID, Amazon account, Mac administrator’s password, and bank account with that single password, imagine the havoc that results when it’s cracked.

COMMENT:  Excellent suggestion.  While I admit I like to keep the passwords simple for me to remember, it makes sense to have three or so that you use so that in the worst of circumstances one password does not open your entire world up to hackers!

There are a variety of strategies for creating and remembering passwords. People often substitute characters for letters—$ for S, @ for A, and ! for L. Others remove vowels—grtbllsffre1957, for a Jerry Lee Lewis fan, for example. Others still write random strings of nonsense, write down those strings, plunk the passwords into their Mac’s keychain, and lock the written passwords in a safe place should they need them. (These are people who have complete control over their computer—the one in their home, not in the office.)

Because I have a brain like a sieve, I use Agile Web Solutions’ $40 1Password. Not only can it keep track of all the passwords in your life, it can also generate them. Like so:

1Password’s password generator

When you come to a website you need a password for, select the password field, click and hold on the 1Password button that appears in your browser, and choose Strong Password Generator. In the sheet that appears the title of the site should appear along with its location. Use the Length slider to choose a length for your password (the longer the better) and click Fill. 1Password will fill in the password field with the password it just generated. It will later prompt you to save the login information for that site—your username and password. When you next visit, you can ask 1Password to fill in this information for you.

If you lack the inspiration to create a password for some other kind of account—your e-mail account, for example—1Password can help there too. Just launch the program, choose Go -> Generated Passwords, click the Plus (+) button at the bottom of the second column, and use a procedure similar to the one I just described to create a new password. 1Password will remember this one as well.

FINAL THOUGHTS:  If creating a simple but effective password can save your bank account, credit card information, Facebook account and email – then it makes sense to take the steps necessary to protect yourself.  After all the best defense is a good offense and creating an effective password is OFFENSIVE RULE #1.


FBI Posts Warning about Haiti Relief Contribution Scams – Tips to avoid being Ripped Off

January 14, 2010

How unfortunate, but at a time when folks need help the most – at that same time – there are those who find the greatest opportunity to take advantage of those kind enough to offer help.  SCAMMERS are in full force concocting schemes to take money that you would give to help and instead help themselves.  Whether it’s 9/11 or Katrina – the disaster makes no difference – Scammers have one goal – DEFRAUD YOU.

More than 400 Internet addresses related to Haiti have been registered since Monday’s devastating quake, Internet security expert Joel Esler said. The names reference Haiti and words such as “earthquake,” “help,” “aid,” “victims” and “survivors.”

Here are tips offered by the FBI, Better Business Bureau and Scam.busters.  Also click here for a video on the subject.

SUMMARY TIPS:

  1. Be skeptical of email through Social Networking sites.  Don’t click on Links or attached files.
  2. Ask for the name and phone number of the charity or request that they put information in writing.
  3. Do Not give personal financial information – You’d be vulnerable to identity theft.
  4. Don’t be mislead by a “Sound Like” Charity name
  5. Ask if the Charity is registered with any organization and get the registration number.  Check with CharityNavigator.org.
  6. Ask what percentage of your gift actually reaches the needy.
  7. Don’t ever donate cash and DO NOT give out your credit car number to telemarketers or use it with a charity you have not checked out.
  8. If the person asks for more…that may be a sign something is wrong

If there is ever a time that the Haitian people need help it is now.  That is not true for Scammers.  Don’t fall prey to a scam.  Make sure your heart felt contribution goes directly to those who need it the most.

Here’s a link to a list of charities that are providing relief to the Haiti effort and have been signed off on by charitynavigator.org.  HAPPY GIVING TO YOU!

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Business Ethics Daily Roundup – January 13, 2010

January 13, 2010

As a business ethics speaker and author, as you can imagine, I work daily to keep up with what’s happening.  My wife asked me the other day, “well…how do you share that?”  It dawned on me, I don’t – except in my presentations and more formal writings.  So – from that simple question was birthed the idea of a daily roundup.

Here goes…and I hope it helps.

Aerospace and Defense Industry Commit to New Global Principals of Ethical Conduct – The first International Forum on Business Ethical Conduct for the Aerospace and Defence Industry (IFBEC) took place today in Berlin.  The forum strengthened exchange between industrial, institutional and state players within these key sectors, encouraging them to participate in the development of fair competition rules. It demonstrated the commitment of the aerospace and defence industry to business ethics.  Full story here.

Scrutiny of White Collar Crime Grows – About 25 embezzlers met their downfall last year in Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky, particularly in Butler County, when they were busted in cases totaling $2.2 million – a record-high for the county, officials believe. Full story here.

Should ‘The Office’ Be Used In HR Training? (this is a really cool story)The Office, a comedy about a jumble of oddball workers trying to get along in a claustrophobic environment, is a phenomenon of our times, a period when the American workforce is more diverse than it has ever been.  The question is – should this quirky comedy be used to illustrate sensitive points when doing HR training?  Full story here.

The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act: An Overview – Corruption poses a significant legal and economic risk for corporations doing business around the world, particularly in developing and transitioning countries.  Because of this increased enforcement activity, managers and directors who run multinational corporations are rightfully concerned about their compliance efforts.  Full story here.

More to come tomorrow.  Meanwhile, for more ethics information and discussion – join me on Facebook – link here.


Facebook Scams and Fraud – Warning from Business Ethics and Fraud Prevention Speaker Chuck Gallagher

January 8, 2010

AVOIDING COMMON FACEBOOK SCAMS  

SCAM #1

I can’t tell you lately just how many times I have had a Facebook friend pop up in chat telling me that they are having a bad day.  Seems that someone mugged them while they were visiting friends in London.  (Guess London is the new fraud hot spot?)

Anyway the fraudster goes on to request money from their Facebook friend and gives them wire transfer information.  NOTE:  THIS IS A SCAM.  I suspect that most of you have figured it out, but just in case – DON’T FALL FOR THIS HOAX.

If you receive this type of communication, Facebook provides an easy solution to help your friend avoid the SCAM continuing.  Here’s Facebook’s suggestion (and it works):

We are currently working with people whose accounts have been affected…
We are currently working with people whose accounts have been affected by money transfer scams. Please use caution around messages from friends claiming to be stranded and asking for money.

Your friend’s Facebook account may have been compromised by cybercriminals attempting to impersonate them. Most frequently, these criminals will gain control of a Facebook account, and use the Chat or Status features to claim they are stuck in a far away location and in need of financial assistance.

If you have received a message like this, please enter your friend’s account information in this form so that we can make sure your friend’s account is secure.

Recently, I had two friends whose account had been hacked.  When I received the request for funds I set up a separate tab and went to Facebook directly typing in the data requested to protect my friend – while keeping the scammers on the chat line.  I copied the chat – pasted it into the Facebook location asking for specifics and while chatting with the scammers (expressing my disbelief at what had happened to them – cause I knew it was all fake), my friends account was shut down…SCAMMER FOILED!
SCAM #2
You receive the following e-mail announcement:
Dear user of facebook,

Because of the measures taken to provide safety to our clients, your password has been changed.
You can find your new password in attached document.

Thanks,
Your Facebook.

This too is a CROCK OF CRAP!  DO NOT OPEN THE ZIP FILE ATTACHED.  It is only a way for someone to gain information from your email address and hack your email, Facebook account or access other information.
Hopefully this information is helpful.
If you know of other scams that are currently being used and wish to help alert other, please make a comment.  Facebook is a wonderful tool and worth keeping safe.

Ethics Speaker Chuck Gallagher to Address University of South Dakota Business Ethics Symposium

April 26, 2009

VERMILLION, S.D. – During troubled economic times, Chuck Gallagher isn’t afraid to share his story of success – and how he lost it all. Gallagher, a business executive and motivational speaker, will be a guest of the Beacom School of Business of The University of South Dakota on Monday, April 27 at 7 p.m. in the Wayne S. Knutson Theatre.

Gallagher, a former CPA who lost everything because of poor choices, will present the program “Choices: Negative Consequences, Positive Results” where he will discuss some of the decisions he made in his attempts to make a better life for he and his family. Gallagher eventually lost it all, spent time in federal prison, but has found success again by making the right choices – personally and professionally.

“My lecture deals with issues of business ethics, particularly the choices we make in life and the consequences that follow,” says Gallagher. “Having been a successful CPA in the 80s, spent time in federal prison in the 90s and risen to the level of senior VP in a public company in the 2000s, I can speak from experience that I’ve lived with negative consequences thanks to some very stupid choices I made. But I’ve also had some incredible positive results based on the choices I made after spending time in a federal prison.”

Gallagher’s message is sure to resonate with students who are seeking answers on what it takes to be successful in today’s business world despite the presence of poor ethics and negative consequences. Ultimately, he explains, it’s about students differentiating themselves – positively – from their peers.

“I’m the poster child of what not to do,” he admits. “Ethical issues aren’t always black and white. If you want to be successful, ask the question ‘what are you doing to differentiate yourself?’”

A professional speaker, business entrepreneur, and sales executive, Gallagher has led a $40 million sales region with 125 sales representatives and started his own training business with projects in 30 states. Gallagher currently helps employees increase their sales results and skills while realizing the ramifications of their ethical choices. In addition to addressing students and audiences at colleges and universities throughout the United States, Gallagher also shares his business ethics message with business-related and health care related organizations.

“Choices: Negative Consequences, Positive Results” is made possible by the Beacom Opportunity Fund and the Arthur A. Volk Symposium. The Beacom Opportunity Fund provides resources for initiatives that promote the Beacom School of Business’s students and programs. Funding from the Volk Symposium affords opportunities for the business school to bring together students, academicians, and business leaders for discussion of current topics of interest. For more information about “Choices: Negative Consequences, Positive Results,” please contact the Beacom School of Business at (605) 677-5455.

A photograph of Gallagher is available for download at http://www.usd.edu/urelations/images/Chuck_Gallagher.jpg.

About The University of South Dakota
Founded in 1862, The University of South Dakota is designated as the only public liberal arts university in the state and is home to a comprehensive College of Arts and Sciences, School of Education, the state’s only School of Law, School of Medicine, School of Health Sciences, the accredited Beacom School of Business and the College of Fine Arts. It has an enrollment of approximately 9,200 students taught by 400 faculty members. More information is available at http://www.usd.edu/press/news.


Facebook – Nude Student Photos and a College IT Administrator: Robert T. DeCampos, Jr. – Dumb and Dumber!

March 6, 2009

I never cease to be amazed at the stupidity of what people will do with social networking.  Dumb – don’t put nude pictures on your facebook account!  That most would say that is common sense, but it seems that “common sense” goes out the window with some folks when it comes to their Facebook or MySpace pages.

Perhaps someone will get a clue – these are public and can be found!

ADVICE:  Don’t put anything on Facebook, MySpace, LinkedIn or any other site that you wouldn’t want your mother or boss to see.  If you feel that you could be fired or severely scolded for your entries – don’t put it on the site.

Enough Said!  facebook-logo

CRIMINAL ACTIVITY:

According to SouthCoasttoday.com – Robert T. DeCampos Jr., 30, a Dartmouth resident, and computer administrator, faces charges that he illegally obtained nude and semi-nude photos of about 16 female students by hacking into their UMass e-mail accounts and Facebook files.

What did he allegedly do and how?  According to published reports:

His first step, according to court documents, was to search Facebook for female UMass Dartmouth students. Next, he checked the names with the campus Web site.

Then he would use his administrative authority to access their e-mail, where he would attempt to log into their personal Facebook accounts. When that failed because he lacked their Facebook passwords, he would have Facebook send a link for a new password back to their e-mail. The hacker would then open the e-mail to reset the password, then enter Facebook with all the privileges and access of the student.

At that point he could view all of the students’ photographs, including private ones, and do further searches for their friends.

According to The Chronicle of Higher Education:

The university fired Mr. DeCampos last fall after police searched his home and found a portable flash drive containing the photos. Mr. DeCampos, who was released on his own recognizance after the arraignment, is being charged with 13 misdemeanor counts of unauthorized access, which carries a maximum penalty of 30 days in jail and $13,000 in fines. He is also being charged with one count of felony larceny, which could mean up to a five-year jail term and a $25,000 fine.

The Boston Herald also reported:  “Robert T. DeCampos Jr. also attempted to snap “upskirt” images of shoppers at an electronics store in Dartmouth, authorities said yesterday, following a four-month probe into the alleged cyber snooping, according to the New Bedford Standard-Times.”

THOUGHTS:

It appears obvious that DeCampos (while innocent until proven guilty) is experiencing the consequences of his choices.  As an ethics speaker, there is little doubt that DeCampos will likely serve time in prison for his actions.  But there is another question that deserves attention: why would someone put nude or partially nude photos on Facebook?  Is there really a thougth that Facebook is private – that there are no consequences of the student’s actions?

WHAT ARE YOUR THOUGHTS?