Antonio Stone – GUILTY! More Time in Prison for Identity Theft. Comments by Fraud Speaker Chuck Gallagher

September 19, 2008

There are some people who learn from there mistakes and others, it seems, can’t learn!  Apparently Antonio Stone is yet too young to get the concept that crime does not pay.

But, let’s spend a moment with a simple fraud lesson.  It takes three things to truly create an effective fraud:  (1) need; (2) opportunity and (3) rationalization.  Now of the three – OPPORTUNITY – is critical.  Without the big “O” it is not practical or possible to pull off the fraud.

Case in point – Antonio Stone in 2002 pled guilty to possession of counterfeit checks and received 50 months in federal prison. He served that time and was on supervised release.  It will soon be obvious that he didn’t get it – the message that every choice has a consequence didn’t sink in.  I guess almost four years in federal prison wasn’t enough for Antonio.

The ringleader in a counterfeit check and identity theft operation, Antonio Desmond Stone, 32, of Dallas, was sentenced today by U.S. Chief District Judge Sidney A. Fitzwater, to a total of 105 months in federal prison.  Stone, was convicted at trial in June of conspiracy to commit bank fraud, multiple counts of bank fraud and aggravated identity theft.  Stone was sentenced to 105 months in prison.

OUCH!

Well…how did this seasoned former inmate accomplish his new fraud.   Ah…it was the OPPORTUNITY that made it possible.

As the ringleader of the counterfeit check and identity theft operation, Stone recruited bank insiders to obtain confidential bank customer information and used this information to produce counterfeit checks, produce phony ID’s to pass the checks, and recruited others to pass the counterfeit checks.
Three of Stone’s co-defendants, Williana Sharee Johnson, Natasha Toinette McGruder and Meoshia Christine Guidry, pled guilty to bank fraud, and have been sentenced. Johnson was an employee of First Convenience Bank and provided customer account information through others to Stone.
As you read this you might assume that Stone and other co-defendants made off with massive amounts.  I honestly don’t know, but since Stone was ordered to pay restitution of $26,482 one might assume that he got all that time for very little money.
As a business ethics and fraud speaker (see my web site) I often speak to groups about how simple it is to get caught up in behavior that can ultimately have profound consequences.  Most white collar crimes start with a simple wrong that compounded can send one to prison.  In this case, it appears that Antonio Stone made a clear choice.
And – EVERY CHOICE DOES HAVE A CONSEQUENCE.