Business Ethics Daily Roundup – January 19, 2010 – Business Ethics Speaker Chuck Gallagher Comments

January 19, 2010

Don Knauss, chairman and chief executive officer of Clorox, shares his perspective regarding corporate ethical behavior and customer interactions.  “Can an organization really influence customers with the way it conducts its business?” My answer to that question, having been in this business for 28 years, is yes.

Nice to see a corporate CEO who finds the value in ethical behavior and benefit to customers.

The Role of Business Ethics in Relationships with Customers

Now who would have thunk (I know that’s not a real word), that Girl Scout Cookie sales would have anything to do with business ethics.  But, that is part of the lesson… Through the Girl Scout Cookie Program, girls develop five essential skills: Goal setting, decision-making, money management, people skills and business ethics.

Girl Scout cookie booth sales begin this weekend

Firms should put their IT ethics policy at the heart of any new business strategy, according to a new paper launched today by the Institute of Business Ethics (IBE).

Institute of Business Ethics Emphasise IT ethics policy

Bill Daniels — the late cable giant who funded the formation of the Daniels College of Business at the University of Denver — was known for his strong belief in practicing business ethics.

One of the more famous stories about his business practices: He owned the Utah Stars of the American Basketball Association when the team declared bankruptcy in 1975. Though his financial obligations were taken care of, he still spent $750,000 of his own money to repay every season ticket holder and vendor, with interest.

Daniels Fund launches ethics initiative at region’s business schools

Barry R. Bekkedam, best known as a basketball star in the 1980s, later built his Main Line investment firm into one of the largest of its kind in the country, thanks to a knack for attracting money from extremely wealthy families.  Unfortunately, Bekkedam’s Ballamor Capital Management L.L.C., of Radnor, has been struggling with the loss of $30 million of client money to an alleged massive Ponzi scheme.

Seems like every time we turn around we hear of yet another Ponzi scheme.

Radnor firms struggles with alleged S. Fla Ponzi scheme


Facebook – Nude Student Photos and a College IT Administrator: Robert T. DeCampos, Jr. – Dumb and Dumber!

March 6, 2009

I never cease to be amazed at the stupidity of what people will do with social networking.  Dumb – don’t put nude pictures on your facebook account!  That most would say that is common sense, but it seems that “common sense” goes out the window with some folks when it comes to their Facebook or MySpace pages.

Perhaps someone will get a clue – these are public and can be found!

ADVICE:  Don’t put anything on Facebook, MySpace, LinkedIn or any other site that you wouldn’t want your mother or boss to see.  If you feel that you could be fired or severely scolded for your entries – don’t put it on the site.

Enough Said!  facebook-logo

CRIMINAL ACTIVITY:

According to SouthCoasttoday.com – Robert T. DeCampos Jr., 30, a Dartmouth resident, and computer administrator, faces charges that he illegally obtained nude and semi-nude photos of about 16 female students by hacking into their UMass e-mail accounts and Facebook files.

What did he allegedly do and how?  According to published reports:

His first step, according to court documents, was to search Facebook for female UMass Dartmouth students. Next, he checked the names with the campus Web site.

Then he would use his administrative authority to access their e-mail, where he would attempt to log into their personal Facebook accounts. When that failed because he lacked their Facebook passwords, he would have Facebook send a link for a new password back to their e-mail. The hacker would then open the e-mail to reset the password, then enter Facebook with all the privileges and access of the student.

At that point he could view all of the students’ photographs, including private ones, and do further searches for their friends.

According to The Chronicle of Higher Education:

The university fired Mr. DeCampos last fall after police searched his home and found a portable flash drive containing the photos. Mr. DeCampos, who was released on his own recognizance after the arraignment, is being charged with 13 misdemeanor counts of unauthorized access, which carries a maximum penalty of 30 days in jail and $13,000 in fines. He is also being charged with one count of felony larceny, which could mean up to a five-year jail term and a $25,000 fine.

The Boston Herald also reported:  “Robert T. DeCampos Jr. also attempted to snap “upskirt” images of shoppers at an electronics store in Dartmouth, authorities said yesterday, following a four-month probe into the alleged cyber snooping, according to the New Bedford Standard-Times.”

THOUGHTS:

It appears obvious that DeCampos (while innocent until proven guilty) is experiencing the consequences of his choices.  As an ethics speaker, there is little doubt that DeCampos will likely serve time in prison for his actions.  But there is another question that deserves attention: why would someone put nude or partially nude photos on Facebook?  Is there really a thougth that Facebook is private – that there are no consequences of the student’s actions?

WHAT ARE YOUR THOUGHTS?