The repackaging of MIT Marilee Jones: A second chance that’s come a little too soon

December 14, 2009

I’m all for second chances — so much so I even started a foundation to encourage others to find theirs. So when I read that Marilee Jones had started a new life as an admissions consultant, I really wanted to cheer her on — especially given all she’s had to overcome, even if as a result of her own poor choices.

A little over two years ago, Jones resigned as dean of admissions at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) after it was discovered she lied about her academic credentials nearly 30 years before. Still, everyone deserves a second chance — right? — and, today, Jones has reemerged as an admissions consultant who delivers this message to parents: Academic glory isn’t the be all-end all; it’s your relationship with your child that matters most.

So far, so good. But here’s something that raised my eyebrow: Jones hired a public-relations consultant, Rose Marie Terenzio, to help with her comeback. Terenzio’s first order of business was getting Jones to volunteer at Columbia Presbyterian Hospital, where she could help teenage cancer survivors move on to college. However well-intentioned, these steps seem just a little too manufactured.

Here’s hoping I’m wrong. The fact is, facing the truth and operating with honesty, integrity and ethics will serve Jones well — she doesn’t need a PR firm for that. Based upon her own choices, she can now be true to herself and use her experience as a positive framework for helping others. Through that she will receive her SECOND CHANCE!

What do you think of Marilee Jones’ comeback? Too soon? Or just in time? Share your comments here.


Tim Masters – Victim or Victor? Every Choice Has A Consequence!

February 26, 2009

As I rose this a.m. – checking e-mail, CNN – just checking in with the world I was faced with another article on Tim Masters – the Fort Collins, Colorado man who was wrongly imprisoned for 9 years.  This must have been an eternity, especially for an innocent man.  Having spent time in federal prison (justly deserved – as I was guilty), I know that prison can change you.  But, as a business ethics and fraud prevention speaker, it wasn’t the wrongful imprisonment that caught my attention, it was the lead line of the article.

CNN’s writer states:  “Tim Masters squarely blames Fort Collins, Colorado, police and prosecutors for his inability to land gainful employment and for his not having a wife and kids at this stage in his life.”  The full CNN article can be found heretim-masters-youth

I know as I type these next words I am opening myself up to both positive and negative comments.  But, sometimes you have to go for it if you expect positive change to take place.  If the article is an accurate portrayal of how Tim Masters feels and thinks, then…

TIM MASTERS is playing the VICTIM role well!

In my experience, some thirteen years following my prison experience, VICTIMS remain such wallowing in self pity and anger.  Anger, self pity, blaming others for their plight, – you name it – just think of victims you know or have known – none of those feelings or emotions are empowering or bring about positive change.

Here are excerpts from the article:

CNN: Do you have trouble finding a job because of your time in jail?

Masters: Yeah, I think that has a lot to do with it. The first thing that comes up on a background check is “charges dismissed — first-degree murder.”

Better questions are Tim – what are you doing to look for employment opportunities?  Do you disclose your background well before the background check?  Do you capitalize on your notoriety garnering understanding for your unfortunate circumstance and give others a chance to reach out a hand to help?

In my experience, being a convicted felon is an obstacle.  But in Tim’s case he was acquitted.  He is innocent and most people can find compassion to give someone in Tim’s circumstance a chance.  I have found employment in both a publicly traded company and private enterprise since prison and I was guilty – unlike Tim.

The article continues:

CNN: If you could talk to the prosecutors or police who handled your case, what would you say to them?

Masters: I don’t want to talk to them at all.

CNN: Talk about your lawsuit against the prosecutors and police. Who does it target?

Masters: Mainly, [former prosecutors, now Judges] Jolene Blair and Terri Gilmore and [Fort Collins police Lt.] Jim Broderick, but there are a few other defendants involved and the city, but in my mind those are the big three.

I do not fault Tim for his lawsuit.  The law is there to protect, which includes protecting someone for their life being permanently altered by incorrect incarceration.  Given similar circumstances, I would likely do the same.  However, I can’t help but wonder if, while that is taking place, Tim could focus his energy toward something that is positive and empowering?

Like what – one might ask?

Every choice has a consequence.  There must have been reasons that Tim was considered a suspect in the first place.  Not that it was his fault, but evaluating those actions (way back then) might prove to be powerful lessons to youth today.    Tim has a powerful story.  He can have an impact.  He will be heard.  The power to reach out to others and help them discover what and/or who they are and how their choices can shape their life is powerful.  timothymasters

I was sad today to read about Tim and where he is.   The tone of the story and answers to the  questions didn’t feel empowering.  They felt, at least to me, that those who falsely imprisoned Tim had won! Tim can have a wife, a family and a great life – it is truly a matter of CHOICE!

VICTIM or VICTOR – Tim the choice is yours!

Comments welcome!


Students – It’s Time to Think of Facebook in a Different Light! Comments by Business Ethics Speaker Chuck Gallagher

February 16, 2009

Facebook – on of the fastest growing social networking sites can be awesome or can be a curse. Started by a young man who wanted to keep up with his friends, Facebook has become an outstanding tool. Likewise, like any tool, how you use it determines whether it will serve you or hurt you.

As a business ethics speaker I talk to college groups all around the country about effective uses of Facebook and other social networking sites. The creative application of Facebook could make the difference in whether you get that first job (the one you really want) or don’t. The question is – “Is Facebook a tool for business or a public garbage dump for how you feel at the moment?” facebook-logo

Here’s a garbage dump example:

A Calvin College student has been suspended for one year over a lewd Facebook message he allegedly posted about an ex-girlfriend.

According to an article in The Grand Rapids Press, a message about an ex was posted from Tony Harris’s account in November that “referred to the woman in two slang terms and referenced sexuality.” Calvin officials did not return calls from The Chronicle, but the newspaper reported that the college cited Mr. Harris, a sophomore, for violating technology and conduct codes at the institution, which refers to itself as “distinctively Christian.”

The acceptable-use policy on the college’s Web site prohibits “communication that degrades or harasses individuals or groups.”

Mr. Harris, who not respond to requests for comment from The Chronicle, has insisted that the ex-girlfriend, who he said knew his Facebook password, logged in to his account and sent the message herself, presumably to frame him, the newspaper reports. Calvin officials were apparently unconvinced.

In order to resume his studies at Calvin in a year, Mr. Harris will need to re-apply to the college and recant the Facebook message, according to report. —Steve Kolowich

Now, ethically speaking, Mr. Harris used Facebook as a public garbage dump for how he felt about his ex-girlfriend. Not only was that less than honorable, but it had repercussions far greater than Mr. Harris would have expected when he posted his thoughts or feelings.

Every choice has a consequence.

The Consequence: Kicked out of school! Not allowed to return without reapplying and who knows what other repercussions he is experiencing from his ex-girlfriend and parents. In fact, one might wonder how many girl would now want to be his girlfriend since he has demonstrated that he might not honor them when they part?

There’s a saying – “garbage in — garbage out.”

While Facebook may have been started as a social networking site, it is rapidly becoming a “product/person differentiation site”. In other words, with Facebook being public and searchable, people of all ages who use it should consider that it is nothing more than a personal web site. What you put on there is your advertisement of yourself. If you want to sell yourself, you need to consider what you say and how you position yourself.

Facebook is a powerful tool – use it to your advantage!

Read the rest of this entry »


Business Ethics and Tutorial Websites Like ‘studentoffortune.com’ – Really?

November 10, 2008

Just like clockwork every day I receive an e-mail from google listing the new content for a selected topic – “Business Ethics” – a topic I specialize in as a speaker. Most days there is something of interest – either a new article, headline or blog posting. But over the course of the past several weeks I have begun to see a new entry in this arena and I must say it caught me by surprise.

Read below – as this is copied from the goole alert that I received in early November 2008. After you read, I’llHigh School Series offer some comments.

$50.00 – Research Paper Business Ethics
Research Paper Needed My topic will be Freddie Mac and the mortgage crisis, government bailout and the ethical impact this had on the nation. Research Paper Requirements 1) Length: 5 – 7 pages (Not including title page and reference
Student of Fortune – Recent Questions – http://studentoffortune.com/

SO WHAT DO YOU THINK?

Maybe it’s just me, but frankly I was amazed. It appeared that “studentoffortune.com” was a brokerage house for – what I would describe as – truly unethical practices. I was shocked. I knew that there were places on line where one might buy papers, etc. for school, but never thought that someone could advertise blatantly for homework “prostitution.”

Well I looked a bit further…and another entry that made the “google” list for business ethics. Hum…

$50.00 – Business Ethics
Has anyone taken a Business Ethics Class, I am totally lost. I do not know how to get the APA references the only reference the teacher wants us to use and I have a paper do. I go to the online library but is finding myself lost.
Student of Fortune – Recent Questions – http://studentoffortune.com/

Wow…

Well maybe this wasn’t what I thought it was until I researched the site. As best I can tell it is promoted as on-line tutorial for money. O.K. I thought. But the idea of a tutorial is help – not someone doing it for them. So, tell me if I’m wrong, but look at this next one – cause what I see is someone buying a paper for $10.00.

$10.00 ECO205 Final Project: Industry Research Completion (Auto Industry)

Q:

Final Project: Industry Research Completion
· Resource: Appendix A
· Due Date: Day 7 [Individual] forum
· Write a 1,750- to 2,450-word paper in APA format that provides an economic profile of
the industry you have researched. In your paper, discuss how the following impact the
industry.
o Shifts and price elasticity of supply and demand
o Positive and negative externalities
o Wage inequality
o Monetary and fiscal policies
· Conclude your paper with final thoughts on:
o How the economy affects the success of your chosen industry
o Economic influences that can affect the industry in a negative way
· Post your paper as a Microsoft© Word attachment.

Attachments:
eco205_appendix_a[1].doc (41K)

Somehow…I see this bastardizing the whole concept of BUSINESS ETHICS.

Would love to have your comments…perhaps some of you see something different than what I see on the surface.

Read the rest of this entry »


Bank of America – Taking Advantage of Youth – Is that Ethical?

November 6, 2008

As my fingers rest on the keys of this keyboard, I have heard from colleagues that I should avoid writing on this subject – as Bank of America – might elect to be a client and wouldn’t appreciate negative publicity. My question back to them was – as an ethics speaker and author – don’t I have a responsibility to speak the truth?

“Yes” was their reply “but at what peril?”bank-of-america-logo

So…being honest I have debated for days whether to write or not. In the end…I have elected to as I feel that ethical choices – at times – may mean less money or less business – but in the end – doing the right thing will always pay off. If I am to discuss someone else’s ethics, I must stand behind mine.

THE STORY: My son, Alex, received his “check card” and bank account from deal ole dad (that would be me) sometime after he was 16 years old. Weekly I would place his allowance on it and tried to help him understand how to responsibly use this first intro into banking.

He kinda got the idea – in that he knew if he presented his card that if there were no funds it would not be accepted. Likewise, he knew that he could take the card to the ATM and check the balance anywhere. Simple – so he thought.

Quick Reality Check: What the bank shows as an available balance isn’t always THE available balance. You would think in this modern day of instant transactions that once you use the card the amount used would “immediately” be subtracted from your account. Most of us adults know – NOT SO. Young people don’t get that. Let me repeat – YOUNG PEOPLE DON’T GET THAT! They think that if you send a text (for example) and it arrives within seconds – then when you use your card the money is withdrawn in the same time. In their minds why would it not be?

Back to the story – So as Alex nears the end of his 17th year he overdraws his account. Seems that he didn’t know the balance in his account when he drove into the convenience store one weekend. He pumped gas and paid with his checkcard. A little later that day, he went to the Bank of America ATM and checked his balance. All seemed well. So he went to the movie, purchased some popcorn and a drink, later purchased a sandwich from Subway and got some gum from the convenience store. All purchases were made with his checkcard – against a balance he thought he had – afterall, the ATM told him his balance “after” he pumped his gas.

Adult readers know exactly where this is going. The gas purchase had not yet been removed from his account as it was done over the weekend…and all the other purchases exceeded the balance in his account. HE WAS OVERDRAWN.

Is that the ethical issue – Not a chance – that’s life. And at times life comes at you hard. For Alex the very real realization was that for each overdraft he owed $35. Yes – my son – you owe $35 for purchasing a $1.29 pack of gum. “That’s not right dad,” I remember him telling me. To which I replied, “Then take it up with the bank…you got yourself into this you can pay yourself out.”

HELP WITH AN INTERESTING TWIST: Up to this point the issue is my son screwed up. But, true to my suggestion he went to his local Bank of America branch to seek help. Oh, by this point he had turned 18.

He met with the Assistant Manager and told her his plight. She was kind in helping him (so it seemed) and “split the difference” on the overdraft charges – she forgave some and he paid the rest – then she suggested that he apply for a “STUDENT CREDIT CARD.” She told him that the credit card would provide him overdraft protection and keep him from having problems like he just had.

What do you think he did? He SIGNED UP! No questions asked…it just seemed like a good idea and (not knowing any better) he took her trusted advice. She did tell him that he would need to link it to his account when he got it. Reality check: Link it to an account when you’ve never had a card before doesn’t connect. That’s like telling a guy in his 20’s you need to have your PSA checked. They’ll look at you and say O.K., but not know what a PSA test is!

Reality Check: Likewise, she never told him that the suggestion she was offering was not “free.” Turns out that if the card is linked to the account it will advance funds to cover an overdraft (that’s what he was told). What he was not told was that there is a COST involved. Seems that Bank of America charges $10.00 per overdraft transfer. Hum…so let me get this straight – the $1.29 pack of gum which cost him $36.29 would now cost him $11.29. Great deal huh?

Back to the story… The card came in and he did exactly what he thought she told him to do. It said on the card – call this number to ACTIVATE your card. Well since it had been a week or so since he had been in the bank – he assumed that the instructions on the card were what she was talking about and so he did what he was told to do (or so he thought) and he activated the card.

BIG PROBLEM NOW: A month of so passes – no problems – then in July ’08 he overdrew his account again – and again it was the weekend nightmare. Minor purchases were made – 10 in fact – that each were overdrawn from his checkcard. POINT OF INTEREST: For any readers, if your children have checkcards – do they maintain a check register? My guess is NO! Most of them have never written a check in their lives and don’t connect with the “write it down and keep the balance” mentality of adults. The rest of this story – YOU GOT IT – HE WAS CHARGED $350.00 in overdraft fees.

He was devastated and I was furious. He went back to Bank of America and once again talked with the same Assist Manager who encouraged him to get the credit card (without full disclosure – that begs and ethical question). She told him that he was to “link” it. He thought by “activating it” he had. No…per this Assistant Manager it was his fault. There was nothing she could do to help him. Well, she could transfer the OVERDRAFT charges to his credit card and clear his checking account.

Faced with no acceptable option he elected to have the fees transferred over to his credit card. NOW LET ME GET THIS IN MY HEAD. A bank officer with Bank of America suggests a kid get a credit card to help with overdrafts. She doesn’t follow up to link the account of have it automatically link, she assumes that kids who have ZERO experience will know what to do. She doesn’t tell him that there are continued charges if he does overdraft. Oh, and she suggests the transfer of $350 of fees (profits to Bank of America) into a credit card where they will get MORE FEES. Sorry, but that just seems irresponsible, greedy and UNETHICAL.

THE REST OF THE STORY: It’s early October ’08 and my son is now in college. He and I visit another Bank of America branch seeking help for this situation. We met with another Assistant Manager who appeared to want to help. We shared the story and she was appalled. She said that anytime she suggested that a kid get a card – she would follow up to make sure the card was linked. That made sense to me.

With a Masters in Accounting – I understood the numbers. While I didn’t like the fact that my son was maneuvered into a credit card that still cost him should he overdraft his account, I accepted that fact.

So what would be a fair outcome? I suggested that if the card had been linked properly in the first place he would have been charged $10 for each overdraft incident or $100.00. He was charged instead $350.00. It would seem the fair, just and ethical response would be a $250.00 credit on his card. SIMPLE.

Nope…not so…you see there’s profit involved and which branch would “suck up” that loss? The branch in his college town called the branch in his home town. One Assistant Manager talked to the other Assistant Manager. At least the one in his home town told the truth – the facts are as I’ve stated. But she was unwilling to take the charge – afterall it would be charged against her branch. (And apparently Bank of American needs all the money it can earn from what ever source including unsuspecting young people). Of course, the Assistant Manager in his college town…well, she was sympathetic but unwilling to take the charge either – afterall she or her branch didn’t create the problem.

QUESTIONS: Does a bank have a responsibility to fully disclose all charges and possible pitfalls when suggesting to young people that they subscribe to a product of theirs?

Is it right to suggest to a young person that they should obtain a credit card for a specific purpose without first disclosing that there are fees for the application of that purpose?

Is Bank of America so motivated by profit at the branch level that they would elect to look past the obvious ethical choice in order to keep $250.00 profit from an 18 year old who knew no better?

Perhaps the last question: Am I the one off base here?

Oh…per the Bank of America Web Site related to their Code of Business Ethics the following is stated: The code, in effect, explains what we mean when we say one of our core values is “doing the right thing.” Somehow I can’t think that charging unsuspecting newly turned 18 year olds is “the right thing” – but perhaps I am off base?

Your comments are encouraged and welcome!

Read the rest of this entry »


Message To My Son – Every Choice Has A Consequence! Hear My Voice Speak from A Painful Prison Experience!

October 6, 2008

Tonight this blog entry is very personal for me.  I have debated whether to write it and share.  It is easy to talk about other people’s issues and problems, it is even easy to talk about my own, but when they come home to you it often brings up pain that seems, at times, best supressed.

I spent time in Federal prision for stupid choices I made, now some 23 years ago.  As a speaker today, I share with audiences from coast to coast the valuable lessons I have learned from the consequences that followed the painful mistakes I have made.  I am not proud of my past.  I am not proud of having served time in Federal prison.  I am not proud of the shame and financial hardship I have brought on my family.  I am not proud that I was a poor husband and did not live up to my commitment to my wife.

A wise man, however, once told me, “You have made a serious mistake; however, YOU are not a mistake!”

Those words, spoken to me in a phone conversation in Boise, Idaho, saved my life.  It was then that I knew, whatever the consequences I must face for the actions I had made, if I could somehow teach my children and lead them to make better choices – it would be worth it.

Tonight one of my son’s shared with me quite innocently, that he had taken (stolen to be clear) something insignificant from a local store while a freshman in college.  Even as I write this I am having trouble coming to grips with the depth of emotion I feel.  The joy that we experienced just moments and hours earlier was shattered with this revelation.

Consciously I tried to pass it off as a simple college prank, a dumb choice.  I thought to myself, “Surely everyone has shoplifted once in their life.”  But in reality, no matter what I thougth or tried to think, there was no way to describe the depth of sadness I felt knowing that my child who I saw through innocent eyes, was marching down the same path that I walked some many years ago.  My heart ached.

As we parted tonight I needed time to collect my thoughts.  Here I was a motivational speaker – addressing groups on business ethics, on choices and consequences, and yet the greatest audience that I needed to address was my son!  Perhaps the greatest speech I will ever give will be to him.

While I can’t speak for you who read – if anyone will read this entry – but at times I can more powerfully speak after I have had time to write as writing to me brings clarity.  God knows I have to have clarity of message if I am to help my son learn from my mistakes.  Therefore the following is an e-mail I wrote to him, hoping that it will pave the way for a frank and loving discussion tomorrow.

It will be just you and I having lunch tomorrow.  I feel that we need some time together – just us two.

Tonight was a bit of a roller coaster for me.  I was so happy to see you.  You don’t have any clue just how special you are to me and how loved you are by me.  I may not say it enough or show it enough, but it doesn’t change the fact that the feeling is there.  Dinner was great as was the conversation.  It always is with you.

I know it was not intentional, but the bombshell you dropped on me that you would willingly steal something sent shock waves through me.  I may poke fun at my experience in prison, but it was a very real and painful experience.  I poke fun to mask the true pain and shame I feel from the choices I made.  And, yes, today I still pay the price for those choices.

In my wildest dreams I would never have thought that you would do (yes, I know it is not the magnitude of what I did), what I did – knowing the painful price we all paid.  I am sad, angry and disappointed.  I am disappointed that you would, either by desire or peer pressure, do something that (I assume) you know is wrong.  I believe that in your youthful stupidity, you have no clue the significance of taking that first innocent step.

What I did was wrong, but understand I didn’t start by stealing a bunch…it started by stealing a little and finding out that I didn’t get caught.  Whether you want to admit it – you have done the same thing.  There is no difference and there is no justification.  It takes three things to commit a fraud and you proved to me tonight that you, just like I, can use all three and that makes me deeply sad.

Tonight the joy I have with you as my child has turned to a deep concern for you as an adult.  Every choice has a consequence and you have yet to see or experience the consequence of your choice.  Do not follow in my footsteps.  I can hear you now saying to me, “Dad, I won’t.”  But your actions tell me that you are capable of doing just that and, trust me, prison as a result is not worth any stupid choice.

As your father, allow me to serve as example of what not to do.  If I can do that, then the painful consequences of my past choices will be worthwhile.

If there has ever been a time to listen to your dad – now is that time.  Please read these words more than once and know that my love for you doesn’t change.

See you tomorrow.

Dad

In our lives there are defining moments, this is one for him and me.  It is true, we all make mistakes, but we are not mistakes.  I pray that the words I share in love will be heard and understood.  I pray that he will get it.  There is power in numbers so those who read with compassion…join me in praying that this message finds willing ears in my son and, too, for all the others who hear in my presentations to youth nationwide.


Child Porn Law Upheld by Supreme Court! “Protecting Our Kids” Speaker Chuck Gallagher Comments

May 19, 2008

Justice Antonin Scalia wrote the majority opinion for the Supreme Court in which they upheld the law aimed at preventing child pornography. Scalia called internet child porn a “threat.” He’s right. As a frequent speaker on teen ethics and computer crimes, it is clear that the internet is becoming a distribution haven for child porn and more importantly it is a playground for child predators.

A federal law, the “Protect” Act enacted in 2003 made it a crime not only to produce and possess child porn, but also to “pander” material, conveying the belief that material contains minors engaged in sexually explicit conduct. The pandering provision covers anyone who “advertises, promotes, presents, distributes, or solicits” this material.

According to CNN in a recent report: As part of a 2004 sting operation, an undercover Secret Service agent (using the screen name “Lisa–n–Miami”) communicated with Williams in an Internet chat room. Williams allegedly wrote, “Dad of toddler has ‘good’ pics of her an (sic) me for swap of your toddler pics, or live cam.” He posted nonpornographic photos of a young girl and claimed he had “hc,” or hard-core, kiddie pictures, prosecutors contend.

The man then allegedly posted photos of youngsters involved in “sexually explicit conduct,” according to court records. Twenty-two other child porn images were found on his home computer.

A federal appeals court upheld a possession conviction against Williams, but threw out the separate soliciting charge, which carried a five-year mandatory minimum sentence. A three-judge panel concluded the provision was “substantially overbroad and vague,” and that “non-commercial, non-inciteful promotion of illegal child pornography, even if repugnant, is protected free speech.” In other words, the judges said merely talking about child porn is not necessarily criminal.

Today’s ruling by the high Court upheld the law by ruling that a provision dealing with “pandering” illicit material does not violate constitutional protections on free speech. The ruling was 7 to 2.

Scalia stated, “Child pornography harms and debases the most defenseless of our citizens. This court held unconstitutional Congress’ previous attempt to meet this new threat, and Congress responded with a carefully crafted attempt to eliminate the First Amendment problems we [earlier] identified.”

There has been some concern that some people might be targeted unfairly when engaged in lawful, artistic or editorial free speech. Example were used among them were mainstream movies such as “Lolita,” “Traffic,” and “Titanic,” all of which depicted scenarios in which underage girls were engaging in simulated sex.

According to the AP – Justice David Souter, joined by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, dissented. Souter said promotion of images that are not real children engaging in pornography still could be the basis for prosecution under the law. Possession of those images, on the other hand, may not be prosecuted, Souter said.

“I believe that maintaining the First Amendment protection of expression we have previously held to cover fake child pornography requires a limit to the law’s criminalization of pandering proposals,” Souter said.

The reality is child porn is too easy to get and in so many ways our children aren’t protected. Odd, but the profile of a person convicted of child porn is – ANYONE. Most recently a Plano, Texas minister who was arrested in an internet sex sting operation has resigned his position as a pastor at a Dallas-area megachurch. Joe Barron was charged with solicitation of a minor. The solicitation was via the internet.

As a white collar crime speaker, unlike traditional forms of white collar crime, convictions related to Child Porn seem to carry far greater sentences and long term consequences. One of the most significant things that parents can do is become educated. Child porn is more accessible via the internet and that – THE INTERNET – is where parents need education. Social networking sites such as MySpace, Facebook and others are not dangerous on the whole, but Child Predators can use those mediums as a way to deceive and commit their crimes. I teach seminars and workshops on cyber-crime and what every parent should know to protect their children.

If you or your organization is interested in my newest program – PROTECTING OUR KIDS: What Every Parent Should Know About Computer Crimes – contact me at chuck@chuckgallagher.com.